Social Media coverage of “Maspero”: Solidarity between Muslims and Christians post The Egyptian Uprising

  • Amal Bakry College of Journalism & Communications, University of Florida
  • Mariam F Alkazemi College of Journalism & Communications, University of Florida

Abstract

The current study examines the print and social media coverage of the “Maspero” massacre in Egypt, in which military forces attacked Coptic Christians in a predominantly Muslim country. By employing a qualitative content analysis, the authors examine the role of media in inducing a state of social cohesion. Data were collected from a state-owned newspaper, Al-Ahram, and an independent newspaper, Al-Masry Al-Youm. Data were also collected from a blog that compiles testimonies of witnesses to the “Maspero” massacre as well as three of Egypt’s best-known online activists: Alaa Abd El Fattah (@alaa), Salma Said (@salmasaid), and Rasha Azab (@RashaPress). The results reveal the themes of print and social media coverage of the events, with the suggestion that social media was much more effective in inducing social cohesion than the print media.
Published
2016-04-24
How to Cite
Bakry, A., & Alkazemi, M. (2016). Social Media coverage of “Maspero”: Solidarity between Muslims and Christians post The Egyptian Uprising. Romanian Journal Of Communication And Public Relations, 16(3), 61-72. doi:10.21018/rjcpr.2014.3.176
Section
Articles

Keywords

Maspero, Egypt, Social Media, Social Cohesion, Community Media